AESTHETICS FOR BIRDS

Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art for Everyone


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Kenneth Walden Wins the Inaugural Danto/ASA Prize!

Military Symbols 1, Marsden Hartley, ca. 1913–14, Charcoal on paper, 24 1/4 x 18 1/4 in., The MET

The American Philosophical Association and the American Society for Aesthetics are pleased to announce that Professor Kenneth Walden (Dartmouth College) has been selected as the winner of the inaugural Arthur Danto/American Society for Aesthetics Prize for his paper, “Art and Moral Revolution.”

The Danto/ASA Prize, in the amount of $1,000, is awarded to a member of the APA and the ASA for the best paper in the field of aesthetics, broadly understood. In addition, a symposium in honor of the recipient of the prize is held at the APA Eastern Division meeting, normally the next such meeting following the selection of the prize winner. This prize is in honor of the late Arthur Danto, a past president of the APA Eastern Division.

Walden is assistant professor of philosophy at Dartmouth College. His areas of expertise are ethics, epistemology, Kant, and aesthetics. He received his Ph.D. from MIT. Walden has published in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Ethics, Philosophical Studies, and Oxford Studies in Metaethics, with two articles forthcoming at other journals.

The chair of the selection committee said, “Works of art can effect incremental tweaks to our moral concepts or patterns of moral response. Kenneth Walden’s “Art and Moral Revolution” contends that art sometimes goes further, transforming frameworks of moral thought. In the spirit of Arthur Danto, in whose memory this prize is given, Walden advances an ambitious and far-reaching argument through insightful redescriptions of Wagnerian opera and the provocative street performances of the Cynics.”

Original post: http://blog.apaonline.org/2017/06/21/kenneth-walden-wins-the-inaugural-dantoasa-prize/


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Arthur Danto ASA Prize – Deadline 5/31

The Arthur Danto/American Society for Aesthetics Prize will be awarded to a member of the APA and the ASA for the best paper in the field of aesthetics, broadly understood, in a refereed journal, or an original book chapter or original essay published in a collection with a multiplicity of contributors. This prize is in honor of the late Arthur Danto, a past president of the APA Eastern Division.

Arthur C. Danto, Head, 1957, woodcut,
15”x18.25”. Photo: Liz Murphy Thomas.

The winner receives a $1,000 prize. In addition, a symposium in honor of the recipient of the prize is held at the APA Eastern Division meeting, normally the next such meeting following the selection of the prizewinner.

The nomination deadline is May 31, 2017.

Nominees must be members of both the APA and the ASA in the year of the nomination. For the inaugural award, nominated papers must have been published in 2015 or 2016. Nominations must be from a person who is a member of both the APA and the ASA at the time of nomination. Self-nominations are not permitted. To submit a nomination, fill out the Danto/ASA Prize nomination form.

We look forward to receiving your nominations!

 


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New Arthur Danto/ASA Prize Announced

The American Philosophical Association and the American Society for Aesthetics are pleased to announce the establishment of the Arthur Danto/American Society for Aesthetics Prize. The prize recognizes outstanding published work in aesthetics in honor of the late Arthur Danto, a past-president of the APA-Eastern Division.

The Prize will be awarded to a member of the APA and ASA for the best paper in the field of aesthetics, broadly understood, in a refereed journal, or an original book chapter or original essay published in a collection with a multiplicity of contributors. The award will be presented in even-numbered years, commencing in 2018.

The winner will receive a $1,000 prize. In addition, a symposium in honor of the recipient of the Prize will be held at the APA Eastern Division meeting, normally the next such meeting following the selection of the prize winner. The symposium will normally include a summary of the selected paper by the award winner, followed by panelists commenting upon the ideas of the selected paper, then followed by a response from the award winner.

For the 2018 award, the nomination deadline is May 31, 2017. Nominations of papers published in 2015 and 2016 are encouraged from journal editors, authors, and colleagues. Nominations must be from a person who is a member of both APA and ASA at the time of nomination. Each such person may nominate only one paper per year and self-nominations are not permitted. The nominated material should be submitted electronically as a PDF replicating the original publication. Eligibility is governed by the volume year of the journal, regardless of the date on which the issue containing the nominated article actually appeared in print. Any individual may win the Prize only once.

In addition to providing the funds for the award, the ASA will provide travel support to the winner if that person has no other access to travel funds that could be used for the meeting during the academic year of the prize receipt. The travel funds would be determined solely on the basis of financial need, not the perceived merit of the paper.

Selection of the winner and the commentators for the symposium will be made jointly by representatives from the ASA and the APA with expertise in aesthetics, broadly understood.

For more information, please contact prizes@apaonline.org or secretary-treasurer@aesthetics-online.org

The ASA Newsletter dedicated to the memory of Arthur Danto (Issue 33.3-Winter 2013) is available here.


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Arthur Coleman Danto (1925-2013)

There are the good philosophers who contribute in productive and informative ways to the understanding of or debates surrounding significant issues within a certain field of philosophy. Then there are the truly great philosophers who single-handedly change the shape of the very field itself. Arthur Coleman Danto was without question among the latter.

Not only did Danto lay the foundation for contemporary aesthetics [The Transfiguration of the Commonplace (1983) being his most seminal and groundbreaking work], but he also happened to be one of the most influential and significant art critics of the last three decades. To help put this into perspective, imagine that in addition to writing A Theory of Justice (1971), Rawls also spent the latter third of his life as Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.  

While I’m saddened by Danto’s passing, I’m also so incredibly delighted and honored to be, in however small a fashion, part of the enormous philosophical and art critical legacy he left behind.